Entries from December 2005

Saturday, December 31st, 2005

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Saturday, December 31st, 2005

Privacy

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Saturday, December 31st, 2005

Submission – Ooops

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Saturday, December 31st, 2005

Say Thanks – Ooops

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Saturday, December 31st, 2005

Thank You for Your Submission

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Saturday, December 31st, 2005

Thank You for Saying Thanks

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Saturday, December 31st, 2005

A blue ribbon for kindness

From the Denver Post

NICE note: Read about how this Colorado newspaper editor — thanks to a nice tip from one of his readers — found long lost scrap books made by his late mother. A small act that meant big things to this editor.

By Bob Ewegen

The title of “best Christmas ever” is reserved for the holidays of childhood, when the torture of waiting to open those tantalizingly wrapped presents under the tree seemed to last 40 percent of forever. But an unexpected kindness did make this celebration the most memorable in many years for the adults in our family. more…

Wednesday, December 28th, 2005

Teen finds gift of kindness in returned wallet

From the Statesman Journal, Salem, OR

by MATT MONAGHAN

Michael Cook was all ready for a big day of shopping Monday when disaster struck.

Cook, 16, had just finished eating breakfast with his father and sister at a restaurant in Salem when he realized that his wallet was missing.

The same wallet with no identification and $300 in cash and gift cards that he received the day before for Christmas.

“I figured someone who found a wallet with that much cash and no ID would just take it,” said Cook, a sophomore at South Albany High School.

So imagine Cook’s relief and surprise when he went home — depressed and angry at himself — to find a phone call from Mike and Dee Sanders saying they found the wallet with all its precious contents and wanted to return it. more…

Wednesday, December 28th, 2005

Another reason to be nice: It’ll get you far on the job

From USA TODAY

By Stephanie Armour

The time-worn adage that nice guys finish last isn’t exactly true. Growing research shows that likable employees may have more success on the job.

Likability can even trump competence. A study this year in the Harvard Business Review found that personal feelings toward an employee play a more important role in forming work relationships than is commonly acknowledged. It is even more important than how competent an employee is seen to be. more…

Monday, December 26th, 2005

Acts of kindness rarely get ink

From the Duluth News Tribune

by Sam Cook

Maybe you saw the short item in the paper about a week before Christmas. The one about the anonymous woman who bought clothes for the man she didn’t know. The woman had left a Jubilee grocery store in Duluth, encountered the man, who appeared to be intoxicated, and drove him to a store where she could buy him clothes and shoes. He was barefoot and coatless in a snowstorm.
Among people I have spoken to about that story, I have heard several reactions. Most find it a heartwarming account, especially during this holiday season when those stories seem more poignant.
Some people may question the wisdom of the woman in allowing the man to get in her car. Others have wondered whether any long-term good was accomplished helping someone with an apparently serious problem with alcohol. more…